Monthly Archives: February 2016

Building 3D solids and nets

Today we build 3D shapes from Go Frames.  This is what we know about 3D solids:

  • you name 3D shapes by their base

For example:  This is a hexagonal prism – the yellow base is a hexagon

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(photo cred to Jack)

 

This is a pentagonal prism – the orange base is a pentagon.

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(Photo cred to Sophie)

 

  • we name 3D shapes by the number of faces – for example, Gracie built a 12-sided shape called a “dodecahedron”

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    (Photo cred to Gracie)

  • any solid  that has many sides – is called a “polyhedron “- Nolan built a shape with 20 faces:

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(Photo cred to Nolan)

  • we tried to find out how you name solids with lots of faces like Nolan’s – you need to use Latin!

 

  • shapes with rectangular faces are called prisms:

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(Photo cred to Brae)

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 2.21.45 PMThis is a cube – it has 6 congruent square faces

(Photo cred to Quinn & Austin)

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 2.25.13 PMThis is a Hexagonal Prism – it has 6 congruent square faces and 2 congruent hexagonal faces

(Photo cred to Tuesday)

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This is Pentagonal Prism – it has 5 congruent square faces and 2 congruent pentagonal faces

(Photo cred to Brody)

  • shapes with triangular faces are called pyramids

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(Photo cred to Jasmine)

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(Photo cred to Brett)

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This is a square-based Pyramid – it has 4 congruent triangles and 1 square

(Photo cred to Bella & Abby)

  • 3d solids are made up of 2d shapes called faces

Here are some photos of us at work buiding 3D solids and nets:

Proportional Drawing – Human Faces

Today we worked through a new art project – using grid lines and step-by-step instructions to draw human faces –  the drawings are amazing – I am so impressed by the range of expressions captured on the different faces – the instructions may have been the same for everyone, but the end results are all completely unique.

I asked the kids to photograph and post their work on their blogs, before taking it home – but I have inserted a gallery of all the drawings that were posted today – a few are still finishing up.

If you have the opportunity, please take a look and comment to your child on his/her work – I’m going through and commenting now… but comments from me are not so exciting… they talk to me every day!  If there are grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, friends in faraway places who would be interested in seeing what your child is doing at school – please send them their blog address and encourage them to comment – the more traffic they see on their blogs, the more motivated the students will be to use them.

Math Masters!

I’ve been encouraging students to spend some time, outside of school, or when they have a few minutes during the school day, to use their IXL accounts to practice skills we’ve been working on in Math, and work towards Mastery.

I have noticed, during conversations in Math class, that those students who do spend time practicing skills, are seeing gains and becoming more proficient

I thought I should take a moment to recognize those who have achieved “Mastery” in various skills, and encourage everyone to keep working.

If you don’t see your name on this list… don’t worry – many of you are close to Mastery in lots of different skills… I’ll check back again in a couple of weeks and update this very impressive roster!

Congratulations to:

Jacob – you are a Master of  lines of symmetry and rotational symmetry

Austin C – you are a Master of open and closed shapes, & qualities of polygons

Gracie – you are a Master of matching clocks and times, addition of numbers up to 5 digits, and lines of symmetry

Quinn – you are a master of types of triangles, open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons, and acute, obtuse, right and straight angles

Nate – you are a master of adding 3 or more numbers up to five digits each, subtracting numbers up to 5 digits, and open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons

Emma – you are a master of estimating differences (word problems), open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons, and acute, obtuse, right and straight angles

Hunter – you are a master of regular and irregular polygons, review of 2D and 3D shapes, and introduction to probability

Jasmine – you are a master of place values, word names for numbers, adding numbers up to 5-digits, estimating sums (word problems), types of triangles, open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons, identifying which 2-D shape is being described, and which 3D shape is being described  – wow… that’s a long list 🙂

Brett – you are a master of subtracting digits up to 5 numbers

Estella – you are a master of choosing the appropriate metric unit of measure, and open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons

Claire – you are a master of identifying planar and solid figures

Bella – you are a master of lines of symmetry and introduction to probability

Brody – you are a master of area, lines of symmetry, and rotational symmetry

Natalie – you are a master of adding numbers up to 5 digits, and multiplication facts to 10

Sam – you are a master of adding numbers up to 5 digits, identifying planar and solid figures, identifying which 2-D shape is being described, acute, obtuse, right & straight angles, fractions review, and similar & congruent (another long list!)

Mylena – you are a master of similar and congruent, and lines of symmetry

Austin R. – you are a master of adding numbers up to 5 digits

Joel – you are a master of area

Nathaniel – you are a master of adding numbers up to 5 digits, open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons, and adding and subtracting whole numbers up to millions

Heidi – you are a master of introduction to probability

Sophie – you are a master of subtracting numbers up to 5-digits, and lines of symmetry

Adam – you are a master of adding numbers up to 5 digits, subtracting numbers up to 5 digits, estimating differences (word problems), multiplication facts to 10, creating bar graphs, comparing money amounts, open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons, nets of 3D figures, acute, right, straight and obtuse angles, area, lines of symmetry, decimal models AND…comparing decimals and fractions (wow – now that’s a list!)

Jack – you are a master of adding numbers up to 5 digits, choosing the appropriate metric unit of measure, open and closed shapes & qualities of polygons, acute, obtuse, right and straight angles, place value, and place values in whole numbers

Jocelyn – you are a master of estimating differences (word problems), identifying planar and solid figures, acute, right, obtuse and straight angles, creating figures with a given area, and lines of symmetry.

 

Wow… when I started typing this, I had no idea how long it would take me – you’re amazing – keep up the great work – you’ll all be Masters of multiple skills by the time you leave Grade 4!

Design Challenge Number 3 – a “Block and Tackle” or Compound Pulley System

Over the past 2 weeks, you’ve raised 1 kg weights 40 cm (or more) off the floor, using:

(a)  A single fixed pulley

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AND…

(b)  A Single Movable Pulley

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We went a little over time in Math yesterday, and missed the opportunity to work on our 3rd (and final) pulley design challenge… but Mrs. Meadows has very kindly offered some time in the afternoon for you to work on this (thanks, Mrs. Meadows!)

Today – your challenge is to build a “Block and Tackle” pulley system, that will lift a 1 kg weight 40 cm (or more) off the floor.  You can use any of the materials available to you on the back table.

Remember to use the spring scale to weigh the 1 KG weight before you attach it to your pulley system – How many Newtons of force does it take to raise the weight, using just the muscles in your arms?

Below are 3 examples of a compound pulley system. You could build yours to look like one of these, or you could create a different system – as long as it contains a combination of fixed and movable pulleys, it “qualifies” as a compound pulley.

Before you test your pulley system – make a prediction – given what you know about pulleys – how many Newtons of force will your system need to lift the weight off the ground?  Check with a spring scale to see how close your estimate was.

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Since you’re doing this in the afternoon – I won’t be there to see how you’re solving your design problems – so…. please remember to take photos of the system you build, and post them on your blog.